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From ingenious labor-saving kitchen gadgets to tiny treats, wonderful gifts often come in small packages. These are out best stocking stuffers for 2018.

The true flavor of hazelnuts, these specimens rom Piemonte, Italy allegedly mature more slowly and with more intense flavor thanks to the the cool nights in the region. Already peeled and preserved airtight, they absolutely transform every dessert or dish they touch. Worth the price. —Stacy Adimando, Executive Editor

I don’t normally believe in baking mixes, but this one makes the best pancakes on earth. It’s made from New York State grown and milled flours and makes the fluffiest flapjacks possible. —Stacy Adimando, Executive Editor

This is far and away my favorite way to make loose leef tea for one. If you’re feeling extra nice, include a next-level small batch tea starter kit. —Chris Cohen, Senior Editor

SoCal wunderkind Jonathan Grahm began working with chocolate at 15 and 9 years later he purchased his own shop in Brentwood. Compartés Chocolatier now offers a dizzying assortment of luxe treats and I’m partial to these snacking bars. Pretty packaging and fun flavors make them great for gifting, or for nibbling after dinner with a splash of bourbon or port. —Kat Craddock, Test Kitchen Manager

Nguyen is the first Vietnamese-American owned importer/roaster/supplier of Vietnamese coffee beans in NYC.The direct-trade company is working with a single estate farmer in Da Lat, Vietnam—the most highly regarded coffee producing region in the country. The brand’s founder was a noted graffiti artist before working in education, creating activist documentaries for NBC, and opening the New York Times-recognized Lucy’s Vietnamese Kitchen in Bushwick. Traditionally, Vietnamese and Italian style coffee is typically made with robusta beans—a varietal which has fallen out of favor with the Third Wave coffee movement, which focuses on brighter, fruitier (read: more acidic) beans. Personally, I love these bold and rich underdog beans. Nguyen’s Loyalty (made from a blend of both robusta and arabica) works well in traditional drip coffee but also in Vietnamese phin-style drip for ca phe sua. —Kat Craddock, Test Kitchen Manager

These tender-crisp bits of candied pumpkin in syrup are my new favorite accompanyment to funky, gooey washed rind cheeses like Epoisses and taleggio. Drained and diced, they also make a surprising and exotic addition to fruitcake, mincemeat, and panettone. —Kat Craddock, Test Kitchen Manager

These stylishly packaged sodas are a delightful step up from the classic San Pellegrino sparkling citrus drinks. They’re the perfect size to stuff in a stocking, and have a pleasingly pungent yuzu flavor that is great to drink on its own, or else mix into a cocktail. —Alex Testere, Senior Associate Editor

I cannot tell you how many times I’ve slipped a “leak proof” coffee mug into a tote, making a conscious effort to keep it vertical, and still ended up with coffee leaks and stains all over everything I own. You’d think I would learn, but instead I found this cup from Frank & Green. It’s actually entirely spill proof thanks to a smart little button on the top, and it comes in a range of customizable colors. I look forward to using it every morning, and that’s saying a lot for a coffee cup. —Alex Testere, Senior Associate Editor

Everyone loves a handmade mug, and even if your giftee has too many already, this one from artist Josephine Noel of Recreation Center is probably a good contender for scooting that old one they have from IKEA off the shelf and into the bin. The handle is dipped in industrial rubber which has a very nice feel in your hands. —Alex Testere, Senior Associate Editor

Is it weird to gift someone a razor blade in their stocking? Not if they’re a fan of bread baking! While not necessary to making good sourdough bread at home, a lame, or a dough slasher is a great gift to help them take their hobby to the next level. The walnut handle and brass accents make it just stylish enough to show off. —Alex Testere, Senior Associate Editor

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