Swedish Fruitcake

Swedish Fruitcake
Swedish Fruitcake
The Swedish name translates as fruitcake, but this light cake is only distantly related to the dense, sticky fruitcakes familiar to many Americans.Todd Coleman

The Swedish name translates as fruitcake, but this light cake is only distantly related to the dense, sticky fruitcakes familiar to many Americans.

Swedish Fruitcake
The Swedish name translates as fruitcake, but this light cake is only distantly related to the dense, sticky fruitcakes familiar to many Americans.
Yield: serves 12

Ingredients

  • 4 oz. dried figs, finely chopped
  • 4 oz. dried apricots, finely chopped
  • 4 oz. raisins
  • 12 cup dark rum
  • 1 tbsp. orange zest
  • 1 12 tsp. lemon zest
  • 12 tbsp. unsalted butter, softened, plus more for greasing
  • 1 34 cups flour, plus more for pan
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 cup superfine sugar
  • 4 eggs

Instructions

  1. Combine the figs, apricots, raisins, rum, orange zest, and lemon zest in small bowl; cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for at least 4 hours or as long as overnight.
  2. Heat oven to 350°. Grease the bottom and sides of a 12¼" x 4½" x 2¾" loaf pan with butter and dust all over with flour; tap our excess and set aside.
  3. Whisk together the flour and baking soda in a medium bowl; set aside. Combine butter and sugar in a large bowl and beat with a handheld mixer set to medium speed until the mixture is pale and fluffy, 1–2 minutes. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the reserved fruit–rum mixture and the flour mixture and mix on low speed until just combined.
  4. Transfer batter to prepared pan and smooth the top with a rubber spatula. Bake until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean, 40–45 minutes. Unmold cake onto a wire rack and let cool completely before slicing.