Standing Rib Roast with Black Currant Port Glaze

Standing Rib Roast with Black Currant Port Glaze

Standing Rib Roast with Currant Port Glaze, Late Winter Feast
A giant slab of perfectly roasted beef looks incredibly appetizing on its own, so don't worry about cleaning and exposing (known as frenching) the bones. The fat that remains will help keep the meat moist. Get the recipe for Standing Rib Roast with Black Currant Port Glaze »Bill Phelps

A giant slab of perfectly roasted beef looks incredibly appetizing on its own, so don't worry about cleaning and exposing (known as frenching) the bones. The fat that remains will help keep the meat moist.

Standing Rib Roast with Black Currant Port Glaze
A giant slab of perfectly roasted beef looks incredibly appetizing on its own, so don't worry about cleaning and exposing (known as frenching) the bones. The fat that remains will help keep the meat moist.
Yield: serves 6-8

Ingredients

  • 4 tbsp. unsalted butter
  • 1 large shallot, minced
  • 2 cups ruby port
  • 1 cup black currant preserves
  • 2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt and coarsely ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 (8-lb.) bone-in beef rib roast, fat cap trimmed and discarded
  • 8 cloves garlic, peeled and halved
  • 3 tbsp. canola oil

Instructions

  1. Melt butter in a 1-qt. saucepan over medium-high. Cook shallot until soft, 4–6 minutes. Add port and bring to a simmer; cook, stirring occasionally, until reduced by a third, 6–8 minutes. Stir in preserves, vinegar, salt, and pepper and cook 3 minutes more; set glaze aside.
  2. Heat oven to 350°. Allow roast to come to room temperature. Pat roast completely dry using paper towels. Using a paring knife, make 16 shallow incisions, about 12"-deep, all over the roast; insert garlic halves. Season roast generously with salt and pepper. Heat a 12" cast-iron skillet over high. Add oil and cook roast, turning as needed, until browned all over, 10–12 minutes; set bone-side down in skillet. Roast, basting often with reserved glaze, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the roast reads 100°, 1–1 12" hours for rare. Let roast rest 10 minutes before carving. Serve remaining glaze on the side.