Cassava Nation

For the Garifuna people of coastal Honduras, coming together to cook the foods of their ancestors provides a sense of identity and continuity that transcends borders.

Camilla Leslie Crisanto Avila sifts cassava to make flour for bread while other Garifuna women look on
In Ciriboya, Honduras, Camilla Leslie Crisanto Avila sifts cassava to make flour for bread while other Garifuna women look on.Penny De Los Santos
Boys enjoy a lunch of fried conch, kingfish, plantains, and rice and beans with coconut milk at Restaurante Corozal, in Corozal, Honduras
Boys enjoy a lunch of fried conch, kingfish, plantains, and rice and beans with coconut milk at Restaurante Corozal, in Corozal, Honduras. See the recipe for Resanbinsi (Rice and Beans with Coconut Milk) »Penny De Los Santos
Restaurante Corozal's seafood soup
Restaurante Corozal's seafood soup. See the recipe for Irau Lau Juyeirugu (Seafood Soup) »Penny De Los Santos
fish, green banana, and root vegetable stew
Tapou, fish, green banana, and root vegetable stew. See the recipe for Tapou (Fish, Green Banana, and Root Vegetable Soup) »Penny De Los Santos
Dina Palacios in Ciriboya, Honduras
Dina Palacios in Ciriboya, Honduras.Penny De Los Santos
Women harvesting cassava in Ciriboya, Honduras
Women harvesting cassava in Ciriboya, Honduras.Penny De Los Santos
Pumpkin bread
Pumpkin bread. See the recipe for Fein Tau Weiyema (Pumpkin Bread) »Penny De Los Santos
Garifuna fishermen in Corozal, Honduras
Garifuna fishermen in Corozal, Honduras.Penny De Los Santos
Members of a cassava bread producing cooperative share a prayer in Ciriboya, Honduras
Members of a cassava bread producing cooperative share a prayer in Ciriboya, Honduras.Penny De Los Santos