SHARE

Making ricotta at home is simpler than you think; the easy method detailed here produces the sweet, earthy flavor of old-world cheese by combining whole milk with rennet, which consists of enzymes that act as a coagulant. This recipe makes 4½ cups of ricotta.
See our favorite recipes that use ricotta »

httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_1_480.jpg
1. Heat 1 gallon whole milk and ¾ cup heavy cream over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon and taking care not to scorch the milk, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the milk reads 200°. Skim foam from surface of milk. Pour milk into another pot to facilitate cooling. Add 2 tsp. kosher salt to milk; stir to dissolve. James Oseland
httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_2_480.jpg
2. Carefully nestle pot in a bowl of ice water and stir to bring the temperature down. James Oseland
httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_3_480.jpg
3. Let milk cool to 125°F. James Oseland
httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_4_480.jpg
4. Mix 1 tsp. liquid animal rennet with ¼ cup cold water in a bowl. James Oseland
httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_5_480.jpg
5. Stir into the milk. Let stand undisturbed until the milk has visibly thickened, about 10 minutes. With a wooden spoon, cut a large X in the coagulated surface of the milk. Stir quickly for 15 to 20 seconds to break up the solids. James Oseland
httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_6_480.jpg
6. Using a fine sieve, slowly stir milk in one direction around edge of pot, so that the curds begin to separate from the whey. Continue to stir gently until you have gathered a large mass of curds. James Oseland
httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_7_480.jpg
7. Gently scoop curds, in batches, into 2 disposable ricotta molds or into a cheesecloth-lined colander set over a sheet tray. James Oseland
httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_8_480.jpg
8. Allow excess whey to drain from ricotta for 1 hour. James Oseland
httpswww.saveur.comsitessaveur.comfilesimport2008images2008-07634-113_making_ricotta_9_480.jpg
9. Use cheese immediately or refrigerate, covered, for up to 3 days. James Oseland

MORE TO READ