The Top Recipes You Cooked This Year

Our 20 most popular recipes of 2015

We cooked a lot this year. The test kitchen developed hundreds of recipes, both sweet and savory, but these are the ones readers loved most. From classics like the patty melt and shrimp and grits to homemade Irish cream and something called the Heaven and Hell cake. Here's to cooking even more in 2016.

Chicken Marsala

Pounding the chicken cutlets before cooking renders them thin and terrifically tender. Deglazing the pan with Marsala and stock after cooking the chicken creates a quick, rich sauce.Maxime Iattoni
brown rice, boil brown rice, brown rice recipe, perfect brown rice

Perfect Brown Rice

Cooking brown rice, or at least cooking it well, is tricky. Here is our technique for making light and fluffy rice.Matthew Taylor-Gross

Shrimp and Grits

Like the cooks at Crook's Corner, the celebrated restaurant in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, we recommend using stone-ground grits. They take more time to cook, but their flavor and texture are richer than instant grits. Get the recipe for Shrimp and Grits »André Baranowski

Rose's Famous Caramel Cake

This buttery cake slathered with rich caramel icing has earned local fame on Chicago's South Side—it's one of our favorites to make for special occasions.James Oseland

Heaven and Hell Cake

Heaven And Hell Cake
This rich, multilayered dessert of angel food and devil's food cake, peanut butter mousse, and milk chocolate ganache should be frozen before icing is added and refrigerated before it's sliced.Matt Taylor-Gross

Homemade Irish Cream

Cream, whiskey, vanilla, and coffee combine with sweetened condensed milk for a silky-smooth alternative to store-bought Irish cream. We love it added to coffee, used to sweeten cake frosting, or just on its own, enjoyed over a little ice.Cory Baldwin
Grilled Lobster with Garlic-Parsley Butter

Grilled Lobster with Garlic-Parsley Butter

In this perfect summer recipe, lobster is flash-grilled, then poached in its own shell in a pool of melted garlic-parsley butter.Mark Roper

Greek Pasta Salad

Tangy feta and crunchy veggies get extra body from rotini in this classic Greek-inspired pasta salad. Easy to make and best served chilled or at room temperature, it's a perfect picnic dish.Maxime Iattoni

Treacle Tart

In Britain, treacle is a word applied to everything from sticky molasses to golden syrup, which is lighter in character and in color, and an essential component of our beloved treacle tart.Todd Coleman

Salad Niçoise

Traditionally made with local olives, oil-cured tuna, and anchovies, this protein-rich salad from Provence has become a staple of brasseries all over France. This recipe first appeared in our June/July 2012 issue along with Sylvie Bigar's story The Road to Paradise.Todd Coleman

Harissa

In North Africa, cooks have long relied on this garlicky chile paste to lend depth to cooked meats and vegetables. It's incredibly dependable in its ability to liven up foods—we use it in all sorts of ways, from serving alongside crudités to rubbing grilled meats to topping falafel.André Baranowski

Poutine

The province's gastronomic achievements may reach dizzying heights, but Quebec may forever be known as the place where poutine began. An unabashedly savory collage of french-fried potatoes, beef gravy, and squeaky-fresh cheese curds, poutine is perhaps the ultimate late-night snack. This recipes comes to us from Toronto, Ontario native and kitchen assistant Anne-Marie White.Maxime Iattoni

Four-Hour Baguette

Traditional baguettes are 24 to 30 inches long and are baked in ovens that produce steam, which delays crust formation so the loaves can fully rise. This recipe reduces the length to fit in home ovens and calls for adding ice cubes to a hot cast-iron skillet to create steam.Todd Coleman

Tuscan Bean Soup

Author Nancy Harmon Jenkins uses olive oil three ways in this version of the venerable Italian soup: for sautéing garlic, rubbing on the toasts that accompany the dish, and finishing the soup.André Baranowski

Risotto Cacio e Pepe

Chef Massimo Bottura gave us the recipe for this creamy risotto, a take on the classic Roman pasta dish cacio e pepe that he developed after earthquakes devastated the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy in 2012. Wanting to utilize the nearly 1,000 wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano that were damaged in the disaster, he devised an ingenious technique. First, he simmers parmesan cheese in water, then refrigerates it until it separates into three distinct layers: protein solids on the bottom, a thick broth in the middle, and a parmesan cream on top. The broth is slowly stirred into the risotto, taking the place of chicken stock, while the cream is added toward the end of cooking, giving the risotto a luxurious texture and little need for any additional salt.Farideh Sadeghin

Thomas Keller's Coconut Cake

Thick Italian meringue is sandwiched between moist layers of cake, which is topped off with sweetened shredded coconut in this recipe from chef Thomas Keller. It first appeared in the tablet edition of our Jan/Feb 2014 SAVEUR 100 along with the story 20 Years of SAVEUR: The Fountain of Youth.Helen Rosner

Chinese Spicy Garlic Eggplant

Sweet fried garlic mingles with soy sauce and ginger in the sauce for this wok-seared eggplant.
Ciabatta and Sausage Stuffing

Ciabatta and Sausage Stuffing

This rustic stuffing from Thomas Keller's Bouchon Bistro is made with crusty Italian bread and laced with fresh herbs, aromatics, and sausage.Ingalls Photography

Patty Melt

Some say that the patty melt—a griddled sandwich of ground beef, caramelized onions, cheese, and rye bread—isn't technically a burger, because it has no bun. We love it just the same.André Baranowski
Mexican Chicken Tortilla Soup (Sopa Azteca)

Mexican Chicken Tortilla Soup (Sopa Azteca)

This simple pasilla chile- and tomato-based soup is ladled onto tortilla chips and topped with creamy avocado, jack cheese, and tangy Mexican crema. Get the recipe for Mexican Chicken Tortilla Soup (Sopa Azteca) »Farideh Sadeghin