Every Recipe from Issue #150

by0| PUBLISHED Mar 18, 2019 10:44 PM
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Salmorejo, gazpacho's richer, deeper cousin, is a cool, creamy soup typically topped with chopped hard-boiled eggs and salty prosciutto or Iberian ham; omit the pork to make it vegetarian.
Leave it to the potato-loving Irish to dream up colcannon, spuds mashed with finely chopped cabbage and enriched with lots of cream. Get the recipe for Colcannon »
In northeast Thailand and Laos, laab is made of minced meat lightly poached in broth, then dressed with chiles, fresh herbs, and roasted rice powder.
Simply putting tomatoes, a peeled halved onion, butter, and salt in a pot and cooking them with barely an occasional stir until they are reduced produces a deliciously concentrated sauce.
Butter and brandy makes this classic pâté rich and creamy.
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Scallion pancakes are as widely popular in China as muffins are in America. The basic recipe for a simple scallion pancake—served with soy milk or rice porridge for breakfast—is just a guide. Some like it firmer, some fluffier.
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Shallow-frying green beans blisters them on the outside and renders them tender on the inside, with a whisper of a chew.
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In South India, rice and sambar is a daily meal. A stew made from chana dal (yellow split peas), sambar is a spicy medium for vegetables from miniature eggplants to okra to pearl onions. South Indian sambar is bolstered by sambar powder—coriander seeds, red chile, fenugreek seeds, and curry leaves, among other spices, that are coarsely ground together—as well as spices typically found in garam masala.
A deceptively simple vinaigrette of olive oil, white wine vinegar, chopped parsley, and crushed tomato transforms simple steamed asparagus into a sumptuous and well-turned-out dish—exactly what a great dressing should do.
Classic tomato soup gets brightness and body from crushed tomatoes; smoky depth from bacon; and a luxurious finish from a little crème fraîche. **See the recipe for Cream of Tomato Soup »**
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The recipe for this classic Russian Jewish dish of sauteed onions tossed with pasta and buckwheat groats comes from Philip Lopate
Gruyere pastry puffs are an elegant and easy start to any meal. See the Recipe for Gougeres »
Best known as Egypt's national dish, ful medames is a hearty stew of warmed fava beans stirred with olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic, usually eaten for breakfast.
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This classic salad is easy to make from scratch at home.
Eaten hot or cold, vegetarian or with shreds of beef, enriched with a dollop of sour cream and wisps of dill, this beet-based soup is the quintessence of good Eastern European cooking.
With ingredients like dill, chiles de árbol, and anchovies, this dish is far from authentic Shanghainese, but it's totally delicious.
Our version of this classic uses peeled garlic; after removing the chicken from the pan, keep cooking the garlic until the cloves have all but melted. Then, a quick spin with a whisk makes a smooth sauce well worth the effort of all that peeling. Get the recipe for Chicken With 40 Cloves of Garlic »
The crisp-fried veal topped with luscious egg, salty anchovies, and capers is a brilliant study in contrasting flavors and textures.
Well-seasoned crabs steamed with beer and vinegar are an East Coast summer classic.
Tagine, the Moroccan stew, shares its name with the terra-cotta pot it's traditionally cooked in, whose neat conical lid promotes convection and even cooking. There are many versions; maybe the most classic is braised chicken, green olives, and lemons in a sauce fragrant with ginger and coriander.
Southern Vietnamese cooks often simmer catfish steaks with caramel sauce, and use the fish's head and tail in this refreshing soup brightened with tamarind and pineapple.
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Eggy, cheesy quiche lorraine makes for a refined, delicious brunch.
Joe's Special is one of the most odd and divine scrambles known to man. Consisting of egg, garlic, spinach, and ground beef, the dish originated in San Francisco in the 1920s, at a long-gone Italian-American restaurant, New Joe's. See the recipe for Joe's Special »
This Cape Town specialty generally consists of spiced meat mixed with chutney and tamarind paste and milk-soaked bread, poured into a dish, topped with a custard of egg and milk, and baked until it's golden on top. Get the recipe for Bobotie (South African Meat Pie) »
Spaghetti primavera
Okra, tomatoes, hot chiles, and plum tomatoes lighten the stew's intense richness, but it's the indispensable peanut that gives this dish its essential earthy character.
Eggs Sardou is an ornate New Orleans classic, with anchovies tucked in between egg and artichoke, and a thick hollandaise sauce blanketing the entire dish, scattered with handfuls of minced black truffle, parsley, and ham and served with elegant fried asparagus spears.
The secret to the shimmering roux that tops this classic German roast is a pinch of sugar; it gilds the gravy as it balances the lemon and pickling spices in the dish. See the recipe for Sauerbraten »
Any way you make it, there is nothing like falafel's first bite: the crisp-fried exterior giving way to a creamy center of seasoned mashed beans, garlic, and parsley.
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This New Zealand combination of flaky pastry, canary-yellow yolks, and salty bacon has cross-cultural appeal. Get the recipe for Bacon and Egg Pie »
Slippery sweet potato noodles turned golden from the cooking juices and soy sauce, crunchy vegetables, and tender beef make for a satisfying dish.
In Ethiopia, no holiday meal is complete without Doro Wat, a long-stewed dish of chicken flavored with chile, garlic, berbere, cardamom, and ginger, served with boiled eggs. See the recipe for Doro Wat »
For nasi goreng, leftover rice is stir-fried with a seasoning paste made from chiles, shrimp paste, and palm sugar, yielding a richly flavored dish that's ridiculously delicious. A fried egg on top makes it a satisfying meal.
In this recipe, beef medallions are simmered in a Creole-Italian red gravy including enough tomatoes or tomato paste to color and flavor but not dominate the sauce.
This dish of delicate veal, butter and more butter, cream, and carrots consistently ranks in the top ten when the French are surveyed about their favorite dishes.
This classic Italian-American dish is made from a lean cut of beef pounded thin, spread with a layer of grated cheese, fresh herbs, prosciutto, raisins, and pine nuts, then rolled, tied, seared, and simmered for hours in tomato sauce. See the recipe for Braciola »
Classic banana-nut muffins get a tangy boost from buttermilk and a hearty dose of oatmeal for a nutritionally-packed lunchbox (or breakfast) treat.
A toasted poppy seed bagel is piled high with crisp greens, oven-dried tomatoes, roasted chicken, bacon, a fried egg, and homemade buttermilk dressing for a decadent spin on the traditional club sandwich.
Tortilla española is everything we love about Spanish cooking—lusty, elemental, assuredly simple. Traditionally this Iberian omelet gets its heft from thin-sliced potatoes, but chef Ferran Adria substitutes a generous handful of store-bought thick-cut potato chips.
Crunchy, sweet, and salty, this quintessential chicken stir fry makes for a satisfying dinner for two on a cold night. See the Recipe for General Tso's Chicken »
An adaptable stew from the Brazilian state of Bahia, Vatapa gets its luxurious texture and signature floral notes from coconut milk and palm oil. Get the recipe for Vatapa »
Citrus wheels and edible flowers lend beautiful color to a classic gin and tonic. Get the recipe for Ultimate Gin and Tonic
Unlike French beef stews made with wine, carbonnade—a Flemish stew—relies on the deep, dark flavor of Belgian abbey-style beer. But what really gives the dish its distinctive character is the addition of brown sugar and cider vinegar, a sweet-sour combination that plays beautifully against the caramelized onions and rich beer. Get the recipe for Flemish Beef and Beer Stew »
The creaminess and complex flavor of this beloved Indian curry comes from pureed almonds and cashew nuts.
Saffron gives this risotto its vibrant color and flavor.
A good moussaka—a baked casserole of eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes, and minced lamb or beef under a lush layer of béchamel sauce—is one of the most fabulous things you can eat.
Classic, comforting pot pie gets an elegant boost with the addition of shaved black truffles.
While modern chefs tend towards lighter scallop recipes, this old French dish of scallops poached in white wine, placed atop a purée of mushrooms in a scallop shell, covered with a sauce made of the scallop poaching liquid, and gratinéed under a broiler, is a great way to prepare the bivalve.
Packed with tomatoes, local bell peppers, black niçoise olives, anchovies and tuna, pan bagnat is basically a salade niçoise on crusty bread.
A little ham added to the ricotta filling for this classic baked pasta imparts an extra layer of richness.
In this pub staple, gravy is added to minced meat, onions, and any vegetables on hand and topped with a buttery mound of mashed potato is dolloped on top. Get the recipe for Shepherd's Pie »
Colonial Philadelphia, with its busy waterfront, was well influenced by trade from points south. Among the most famous Caribbean culinary imports was pepper pot. The rich, spicy stew of beef, pork, root vegetables, and greens became a staple in Philly, where West Indian hawkers advertised it with cries of "pepper pot, smoking hot!" Today, at City Tavern, a colonial-style saloon, this version is served. Get the recipe for Pepper Pot »
You can get a bowl of green chili most anywhere in the American southwest, but New Mexicans are particularly proud of their chile verde, with its hunks of juicy pork shoulder and tart tomatillo-based sauce.
Bring out peanut butter's savory side by topping it with a few strips of smoky bacon—cooked extra-crisp to hold up against sogginess. On hearty whole-wheat bread, it's the kind of sandwich you may not be able to wait until lunchtime to eat.
Bigos—a Polish stew of pork shoulder, bacon, kielbasa, and sauerkraut—is perfect for every celebration. Get the recipe for Bigos (Polish Pork and Sauerkraut Stew) »
This simple yet sophisticated, airy yet intense concoction has been a hit with home cooks in America at least since the New York Times published its first recipe for the dessert in 1955.
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Try layering chocolate into the cookie dough for crisp edges and a moist and tender inside.
The King was a big fan of rich sweets, and classic buttery pound cake—flavored simply with vanilla—was no exception.
These classic fork-tine-mashed peanut butter cookies retain all the chewiness and deep toasty flavor you remember.
This two-bite pastry is as rich as the name suggests: its defining ingredients are almond flour, ground pistachios, and brown butter, lightened with whipped egg whites.
There is something about a souffle—a magical blending of eggs, air, and acid—that turns any meal into an unforgettable event.
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For many kids, it's a relief to discover there's no actual egg in a chocolate egg cream--just a frothy mix of cold milk, seltzer, and rich chocolate syrup.
The combination of rum and raisins has long elevated all kinds of desserts, but when applied to a vanilla custard base, the flavors truly shine: a concentrated burst of dried fruit cut by the boozy kick of rum, all cushioned by creamy dairy.
Like a brownie in shape and texture, blondies are packed with all the brown sugar and butterscotchy goodness of chocolate chip cookies, but are softer and more substantial.
There's an unwavering appeal to two layers of golden sponge cake sandwiching thick custard, all topped with a glossy layer of chocolate.
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In 2007, chef Nancy Silverton put an Italian spin on this dessert, calling it a "budino" and topping it with caramel sauce and fleur de sel. Call it what you will, it is still, at its core, everything we've always loved about butterscotch pudding.
Dense, sweet, and slightly nutty, there's no better pair for a cup of coffee than a slice of crumb cake eaten out of hand. See the recipe for Crumb Coffee Cake »
Beautiful homemade croissants, each containing a bar of high-quality dark chocolate, make for an impressive and indulgent addition to a breakfast spread.
Using boiled sweet potatoes rather than baked ones gives this pie a beautifully vibrant color.
This simple bean soup is studded with ham.
This bright, tangy chutney is a great complement to samosas or curry.
The original oysters Rockefeller recipe is a closely guarded secret, but this version gets close with an herb-filled roux and a breadcrumb crust.
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This traditional cardamom-scented Indian rice pudding owes its particular richness to the inclusion of whole milk, which has been reduced by half during the cooking process to produce a thick, creamy base.
Dover sole is a remarkable fish—meaty and succulent, but with a delicate flavor. When it comes to cooking it, the simplest way is the best, as in classic sole meuniere, where butter and lemon subtly enhance the taste and texture.
These crisp-fried cornmeal balls are traditionally served alongside fried fish and tartar sauce in the Deep South.
Named for its light, fluffy texture and ethereal, pale crumb, angel food cake is the perfect base for a whipped cream and syrupy fruit topping.
Warming, filling chicken soup just may be the ultimate panacea. Cooking the noodles in the broth enriches both the noodles' flavor and the soup itself, which thickens slightly from the released starches.
In the Japanese kitchen, "teriyaki" means a dish that's glazed and grilled or broiled. Jarred versions of sweet-salty teriyaki sauce are available, but it's so easy to make from scratch, and so versatile, that we make our own and slather it onto salmon before cooking, which allows the sugars in the sauce to caramelize, for a deep, rich flavor.
A hearty beef stock serves as the base for mushroom and barley soup, a more elegant (but no less satisfying) version of the New York deli staple, elevated with fresh thyme and a squeeze of lemon juice.
The secret to this simple and satisfying pasta dish is boiling the linguine until it's just al dente, so that it will absorb plenty of the briny, winey sauce when the two are cooked together.
You won't find beans or tomatoes in a true Texan chili con carne—just tender cubes of beef and pork, fiery chiles, and plenty of garlic, onion, oregano, and cumin for flavor.
A lean cut like filet mignon takes well to sautéeing in a little fat, as in this classic preparation with a simple pan sauce that's laced with brandy and set aflame—a spectacular feat that cooks off the alcohol and contributes rich caramel notes to the dish.
This tangy, spicy curry from Goa, India, has roots in vinh d'alho, a stew brought to the region by Portuguese colonists. Now an Indian restaurant staple, it comes in countless variations—some fiery, some mild—from the subcontinent to the British Isles.
Whether or not this dish of tube-shaped penne pasta lavished with a peppery, vodka-laced cream and tomato sauce was created in Italy is a matter of heated debate in some quarters; some say it was the result of aggressive marketing on the part of vodka importers. Whatever the case, it has become firmly entrenched as an Italian American classic.
Twice-Baked Potatoes The buttery, creamy indulgence of mashed potatoes meets the visceral joy of digging into a baked potato in this iconic side dish. See the recipe for Twice-Baked Potatoes »
At some point in my early childhood, my mother, Patricia, transitioned a third shift nursing career into a more steady, although infinitely more challenging, job as a special education teacher to mimic my own school schedule. One day she brought home a recipe card from a co-worker that would change our lives forever—a cream of mushroom soup and mayonnaise-laden broccoli casserole topped with stuffing mix and cheddar cheese. Easily pulled off on a busy weeknight, this simple, satisfying dish became more sophisticated as I grew and began helping in the kitchen. Fresh broccoli replaced frozen, cremini mushrooms and béchamel replaced canned soup, and panko replaced stuffing mix, but our devotion to the dish has never wavered. —Kellie Evans
This winey chicken braise dotted with pearl onions and button mushrooms is the first French dish many cooks outside France make, and no wonder: It's as simple to prepare as it is elegant to serve.
This boozy, buttery concoction of caramelized bananas flambéed in rum sauce is a dining-out classic invented at legendary New Orleans restaurant, Brennan's.
Use the ripest, sweetest, smoothest mangos you can find, such as Champagne or Haitian varieties, for this creamy and refreshing yogurt-enriched fruit shake. Get the recipe for Mango Lassi (Indian Mango Yogurt Drink) »
A quintessential muffin recipe combines the nutty flavor of poppy seeds with a generous hit of fresh lemon zest.
A garnish of chopped peanuts and slivered cucumber and carrot add crunch to the silky, savory Chinese-American noodle dish.
An unabashedly savory collage of french-fried potatoes, beef gravy, and squeaky-fresh cheese curds, poutine is perhaps the ultimate late-night snack.
A hard-boiled egg encased in sausage and bread crumbs and then deep-fried may seem like a product of modern pub culture, but the Scotch egg was invented by London department store Fortnum & Mason in 1738.
One of the pillars of the Southern breakfast table, buttery biscuits smothered in a sausage-studded white gravy makes a hearty meal any time of day. A hint of cayenne brightens the gravy's richness, but it's even better with a dash or two of hot sauce.
Pounding the chicken cutlets before cooking renders them thin and terrifically tender. Deglazing the pan with Marsala and stock after cooking the chicken creates a quick, rich sauce.
This French Canadian classic gets holiday flair from apple cider and warming spices. Get the recipe for Tourtière (Québécois Meat Pie) »
During cooking, okra exudes a thick liquid that gives this hearty Cajun stew a sumptuous, silky texture; a little filé powder, made from dried sassafras leaves, further thickens and enriches it. But the backbone of this gumbo, and the source of its smoky flavor, is the roux made by toasting flour in hot oil until it is a deep red-brown. Get the recipe for Chicken and Sausage Gumbo »
These tender ravioli are filled with spinach and cheese and topped with a tangy tomato sauce bolstered with mushrooms, zucchini, and squash.
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Popping sirloin in the freezer for 20 minutes firms it up for easy slicing—the thinner the better when it comes to this classic Korean preparation. After drinking up a peppery soy sauce marinade, the tender meat cooks quickly over high heat, developing a flavorful char. See the recipe for Bulgogi (Korean Barbecue Beef) »
This extra-rich version of fettuccine Alfredo is impossible to resist. Boiling the pasta until it's just al dente allows it to soak up plenty of the creamy sauce.
You can buy the green curry paste to make this Thai classic at any Asian market, but it's so easy to make, and the results are so fragrant and flavorful, that it's more than worth making from scratch.
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