André Baranowski
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1. Some Asian producers package a version called quick-cooking brown rice, from which part of the bran has been milled off, cutting cooking time considerably; quick-cooking brands are sold online and at many Asian markets. André Baranowski
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2. Widely available in supermarkets, long-grain brown rice, usually of the indica subspecies, requires more water and more time to cook but yields grains with a springy character that’s nicely suited to casseroles and other baked dishes. André Baranowski
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3. Medium-grain brown rice, usually of the japonica subspecies, tends to be stickier and more tender when cooked than long-grain rice; it’s the most common type grown in Spain and is ideal for paellas. André Baranowski
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4. Brown basmati rice, grown in South Asia, gets longer, not fatter, when cooked and develops a firm, dry consistency, making it perfect for biryanis and pilafs. André Baranowski
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5. Aromatic jasmine rice has the elegant look of long-grain varieties but cooks up moist and tender, like a medium-grain rice; it’s available at most Asian markets. André Baranowski
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6. Nicknamed baby basmati, tiny kalijira rice grains could almost be mistaken for couscous; sold at Whole Foods markets, they’re a fragrant, quick-cooking marvel. André Baranowski
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7. Nutty-sweet red rice, also available at Whole Foods, owes its color to a pigment in its bran layers; some types are sweet enough to use in puddings. André Baranowski
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8. Ideal for croquettes and risottos, short-grain brown rice, whose grains are barely longer than they are wide, can have an almost creamy texture when cooked. André Baranowski
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9. Expensive and hard to find in the States, Japan’s haiga-mai is a partially milled rice from which the bran has been removed but not the nutrient-packed germ, or embryo. André Baranowski

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