The Smooth, Chunky, Sweet, and Spicy Salsas We Can’t Get Enough Of

Chilean Tomato and Pepper Sauce (Pebre)

Chilean Tomato and Pepper Sauce (Pebre)
Grilled Salsa

Corn Tamales with Tomatillo Salsa

This salsa verde has a fresh, tangy sourness (and kick of heat if you like) that helps cut through richness. Get the recipe for Corn Tamales with Tomatillo Salsa »

Cucumber Salsa

Get the recipe for Cucumber Salsa »

Chile de Arbol Salsa

This salsa is spicy—use it sparingly!—as any serious salsa should be. Its flavor is all chili and garlic, and does well atop nachos, burritos, and eggs. If you’re feeling daring, go for big scoops with your favorite bag of tortilla chips. Get the recipe for Chile de Arbol Salsa »

Tamales with Black Beans

Meat and fat are scarce in Chiapas, so the local tamale dough is much leaner than it is in other regions. The most common meatless versions at the markets in southern Chiapas are wrapped in banana leaves and can include greens like hoja santa or chilipin, as well as black beans. At Yo’on Ixim in Puebla, the women make both blue corn and white corn versions, sometimes adding fresh shelling beans. Frozen banana leaves are easy to come by in Asian supermarkets—moisten them with water to keep them pliable while filling. Get the recipe for Tamales with Black Beans »
Bahians like to ­finish this chunky salsa with a bit of juice from the moqueca, or whatever dish it is meant to accompany. The term lambão comes from the Latin lambere, “to pass the tongue over something.” In Bahia, the traditional mala­gueta chiles are said to ward off negative energy associated with some of the orixás, or spiritual beings. Look for malaguetas and pimenta de cheiro at farmers’ markets, or substitute drained jarred malaguetas from a Brazilian grocer and fresh serranos. Get the recipe for Brazilian Chile and Tomato Salsa (Molho Lambão) »

Salsa de Piña Picante

Pineapple’s firm texture and sweet-tart tang is perfect for salsa and an ideal foil for rich meats. Get the recipe for Salsa de Piña Picante »

Apricot Salsa with Mint

Apricots’ ripe acidity lend themselves well to this cooked fruit salsa, simultaneously tangy and sweet. This recipe ran with Karen Solomon’s web exclusive story Preserve the Season: Apricot Salsa. Get the recipe for Apricot Salsa with Mint »