Julian Medina Kitchen
When the Medinas expanded the house, they made room for this clean, functional kitchen. The stove is a 6-burner Viking range. The countertops are silestone, which is very easy to maintain. To keep the look neutral, they chose subway tiles for the backsplash. There's a farmhouse sink in the island. The barstools are by Xavier Pachaud for Tolix. Viking range, price available upon request at pcrichard.com. Tolix Marais barstool, $335 each at dwr.com.. Matt Taylor-Gross
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Gifts of casseroles and pies will be gone in a day. But buying a thoughtful something for the home lasts a lot longer. Here are some home décor gift ideas for when the garland and wreaths finally come down.

When the new year is rung in and your liver needs a break after sampling your way through our holiday bottle guide, swap out the wine bottle and place Hario’s elegant tea decanter on the table. Try filling it with Hibiscus tea this winter, and it doubles as a floating fuchsia centerpiece. The filter is fixed onto the spout, so you can pour directly from the bottle; keeping the leaves neatly contained inside. —Arianne Jones, Test Kitchen Assistant

This season, decorate your Christmas brunch table with this festive LeCreuset french press. —Arianne Jones, Test Kitchen Assistant

Menus is a new volume from the brilliant and beloved Jacques Pépin. For decades, the French chef has recorded his own personal dinner party menus hand-illustrated books. On one side, inside a watercolor border, he lists the dishes he served. On the opposite side, his guests sign their names and memorialize the occasion. Now, scrapbooky home cooks can record their own feasts in a this pretty bound book of Pépin’s designs. —Kat Craddock, Test Kitchen Manager

The perfect gift for the tiny Test Kitchen directors in your life. —Kat Craddock, Test Kitchen Manager

I love the idea of setting the table for a dinner party with steak knives in theory, but in practice they are usually just too heavy and ostentatious. Which is why I like these lightweight Opinel numbers. It’s like you’re eating steak frites at a hip bistro in Paris, but you’re actually just at your house. —Chris Cohen, Senior Editor

“Malfatti” means “deformed” in Italian, but the glassware from this New York–based husband and wife duo are intriguingly mismatched, each one made carefully by hand from durable and crystal clear borosilicate glass. All of their glassware is about embracing imperfection. Their new wine set features a carafe and two wine cups, perfect for your favorite wonky-but-delightfully-so wine lover. —Alex Testere, Senior Associate Editor

These glossy Danish serving utensils are a lovely and organic touch for a winter holiday table. —Kat Craddock, Test Kitchen Manager

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