Taste of Sardinia

An island in the Mediterranean, Sardinia is noted for its cheese, lamb, and pork dishes. These 8 recipes from SAVEUR magazine, including deep-fried cheese-filled pastries, roast baby lamb with fennel, and fava bean and pork stew, will give you a true taste of Sardinia.

Baked Music-Paper Bread with Rosemary

Baked Music-Paper Bread with Rosemary
While visiting Sardinia we were served this very simple and flavorful snack. Get the recipe for Baked Music-Paper Bread with RosemaryBrooke Slezak

Deep-Fried Cheese-Filled Pastries

Deep-Fried Cheese-Filled Pastries
These pastries are served all over the island of Sardinia. The typical cheeses used are young pecorino and a cows'-milk cheese called peretta, similar to provolone. Get the recipe for Deep-Fried Cheese-Filled PastriesBrooke Slezak

Dried Fava Bean and Pork Stew

Dried Fava Bean and Pork Stew
This stew, though eaten throughout the year, is most popular in Sardinia in the winter, when wild fennel is at its peak. Get the recipe for Dried Fava Bean and Pork StewBrooke Slezak

Sardinian Gnocchetti with Tomato Sauce

Sardinian Gnocchetti with Tomato Sauce
These small ridged gnocchi are perfect for "grabbing" the hearty sauce in this dish. See this recipe for Sardinian Gnocchetti with Tomato SauceBrooke Slezak

Roast Baby Lamb with Wild Fennel

Roast Baby Lamb with Wild Fennel
A simple recipe for this widely popular dish in Sardinia. See the recipe for Roast Baby Lamb with Wild FennelBrooke Slezak

Grilled Mushrooms

Grilled Mushrooms
If you can't find oyster mushrooms, use any variety that won¿t fall through the grate of your grill. See the recipe for Grilled MushroomsBrooke Slezak

Music-Paper Bread Lasagne

Music-Paper Bread Lasagne
Pani carasau is a staple bread for Sardinian shepherds and can be turned into herb-flavored snacks, broken into bits and added to soup, deep-fried into instant fritters, or, as here, utilized as a form of pasta. See the recipe for Music-Paper Bread LasagneBrooke Slezak

Raisin and Nut Cookies

Raisin and Nut Cookies
These cookies, traditionally made for the Day of the Dead, November 1, are so popular that they're eaten year-round. See the recipe for Raisin and Nut CookiesBrooke Slezak