TODD COLEMAN
Recipes

Classic New Orleans Recipes

Explore the culinary capital of the United States

New Orleans is arguably the culinary capital of the United States. With influences from Europe, Africa, and America, the city has a vibrant, unique food culture. Long-standing Cajun and Creole restaurants like Brennan's, Brigtsen's, Bon Ton Cafe, Commander's Palace, and Galatoire's are keeping the city's cuisine alive. Whether you're putting together a Cajun seafood boil with crawfish and corn or making a classic gumbo, we've rounded up all the New Orleans recipes you need for a Big Easy feast.

There are a million ways to make gumbo. Every cook has their own recipe for this thick, hearty meat stew. What remains relatively constant is the base: the trinity of celery, bell peppers, and onions, and a dark flour-based roux for thickening. From there you can experiment—try our versions with smoked turkey, duck, or fried chicken, Andouille is a traditional addition to any gumbo. For an elegant twist on the dish, try using smoking goose and foie gras.

Crawfish are a New Orleans staple. The simplest way to eat them is in a big seafood boil with shrimp, corn, and potatoes. For something cooler, try our cajun crawfish salad creamy with mayonnaise. Maybe the most classic way to prepare crawfish is to make etouffee, a creamy stew of crawfish tails, tomato, and paprika. Served with white rice, it's an unbeatable comfort food.

While we're talking shellfish, oysters are another iconic New Orleans food. It's hard to beat them raw on the half shell, but oysters Rockefeller comes close. To make the dish, invented at Antoine's in 1889, oysters are topped with chopped vegetables and bread crumbs and boiled.

Get a taste of the Big Easy with these New Orleans recipes.

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