When in the South of France, Drink Rosé

Todd Coleman

As Route 7 winds south, it traverses two great rose-producing regions: the Rhone Valley and Provence. Hot, sunny Provence tends to yield pale wines with tart minerality—perfect for summer meals. Mas de Cadenet Sainte Victoire Rose's ($17) earthy finish enhances the region's chickpea socca, while the citrus in Domaine Sorin Terra Amata Rose ($11) complements rich salade nicoise. Cabernet lends juiciness to the Chateau Vignelaure Rose ($22), a foil to briny tapenade and pissaladieres. Mellow Palais Prive Rose ($19), from Luberon, wedged between the Rhone and Provence, tames the sharp mustard in steak tartare. Ruddier and racier than its Provençal cousins, E. Guigal Cotes du Rhone Rose($15) stands up to roasted fish dishes, while the herbal Chateau Mourgues du Gres Fleur d'Églantine ($13) is a match for milder preparations, like fish en papillote. For dessert, the tropical Commanderie de Peyrassol Rose ($20) from Provence heightens the flavor of lemony sweets like madeleines.