Our 11 Hardest Fall Recipes to Master This Year

We know you like a challenge

Fall means prepping for back-to-school fun, tackling fall cleaning, and taking on new challenges in the kitchen. At SAVEUR, we love trying our hand at our more challenging recipes for a taste of sweet victory. Some of these recipes are labor-intensive, while some require a delicate touch and extreme patience. Whether you’re tackling the perfect pies or putting on the ultimate pot roast, here are our hardest fall recipes that are totally worth the challenge.

Pasta in Italy is served lightly coated, not completely covered, in sauce. To avoid overburdening delicate homemade noodles, cut them about ¾ inch wide to help pick up the sauce, and toss gently with spoonfuls of sauce and pasta water a little at a time. Fresh pig’s blood, used in both the pasta dough and ground sausage mix, can be found in Hispanic, Eastern European, or Chinese markets, though you may have to call a few to track it down. Get the recipe for Blutnudeln with Blood Sausage Bolognese »

Spinach Balanzoni With Brown Butter and Sage

Spinach Balanzoni With Brown Butter and Sage

Chicken and Andouille Sausage Gumbo

“There are as many ways to make gumbo in Louisiana as there are cooks,” says chef Frank Brigtsen of Brigtsen’s restaurant in New Orleans, “but the thing they all have in common is the use of a roux.” Get the recipe for Chicken and Andouille Sausage Gumbo »

The Ultimate Stuffed Cabbage (Lou Fassum)

Lou fassum is most dramatic when presented whole, then sliced into thick wedges. Serving the pieces with a stock-based glaze is optional. The dish can also be drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with fresh herbs, or ladled with chicken stock and topped with a dusting of grated cheese. Serve with mashed or roasted potatoes if desired. Get the recipe for The Ultimate Stuffed Cabbage (Lou Fassum) »

Turkish Yogurt and Brown Butter Tomato Sauce

Yogurt and tomato combine to create this delicious, creamy sauce with hints of peppery zest. This sauce is a main component to manti, a Turkish spiced lamb dumpling dish. Get the recipe for Turkish Yogurt and Brown Butter Tomato Sauce »

The Ultimate Pot Roast

A low and slow braise is the best way to transform tough cuts of meat into fork-tender morsels. This version, made with a crosscut whole beef shank, is cooked in white wine and rich homemade beef bouillon layered with vegetables and aromatics for added complexity. Crunchy roasted radishes and a funky flaxseed, herb, and vinegar relish balance the pot roast’s richness with acidity and texture. Get the recipe for The Ultimate Pot Roast »

Duck Pâté en Croûte

Pâté is a labor of love, but it’s worth every step, especially when you bake it in flaky homemade pastry dough and top it with a flavorful gelée. Get the recipe for Duck Pâté en Croûte »

Gnocchi in Sagrantino Cream Sauce (Gnocchi al Sagrantino)

A reduction of sagrantino wine, along with guanciale, flavors the sauce for this creamy gnocchi dish. Get the recipe for Gnocchi in Sagrantino Cream Sauce (Gnocchi al Sagrantino) »

Boiled Cow’s Head (Tête de Veau)

“For me, eating calf’s head is a must in Lyon—even for breakfast,” says chef Daniel Boulud about this Lyonnaise specialty. “It brings back memories of family gatherings and special occasions. We used to raise and slaughter our own calves growing up.” Get the recipe for Boiled Cow’s Head (Tête de Veau) »