Bagna Cauda

Mark Ferri

In Piedmont, winemakers celebrate the end of the grape harvest each year with a dinner that traditionally begins with bagna cauda and ends—according to Piedmontese tradition—with eggs scrambled in the last traces of the sauce.

Bagna Cauda
In Piedmont, winemakers celebrate the end of the grape harvest each year with a dinner that traditionally begins with bagna cauda.
Yield: serves 8

Ingredients

  • 3 lb. cardoons
  • Juice of 3 lemons
  • 12 cup butter
  • 10 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 24 oil-packed anchovies, chopped
  • 2 cups extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Assorted raw vegetables such as fennel, baby artichokes, endive, and radicchio

Instructions

  1. If you're using cardoons see Preparing Cardoons, then place in a pot of salted water with the lemon juice. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat and cook until cardoons are tender, about 30 minutes. Drain, cool, and dry with paper towels.
  2. For the "hot bath", melt butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Add garlic and cook until garlic softens, about 3 minutes. Add anchovies and drizzle in olive oil. Cook over low heat, stirring, until flavors are blended, 10-15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and keep warm.
  3. Serve with raw vegetables —and of course with the cardoons if you wish.