10 Variations on the Negroni | SAVEUR

10 Variations on the Negroni

These bitter and citrusy drinks are a bartender favorite for a reason

First created for Count Camillo Negroni in 1919 at Florence's Café Casoni, the Negroni is actually predated by the Milano-Torino, a mix of bitter, barky Campari and sweet vermouth that evolved into the Americano. Around 1920, at his favorite Florentine bar, Negroni asked for something stronger, so the soda water was replaced with gin, and the Negroni was born. Today, it's a mixologist’s favorite plaything, with ingredients swapped for everything from mezcal to sherry. Here are 10 of our favorite adaptations on the classic Negroni.

Half-Sized Negroni Cocktail (TiNegroni)

Half-Sized Negroni Cocktail (TiNegroni)

Half-Sized Negroni Cocktail (TiNegroni)

Matt Taylor-Gross

The negroni without a headache the next day. Get the recipe for Half-Sized Negroni Cocktail (TiNegroni) »

Broken Negroni (Negroni Sbagliato)

Negroni Sbagliato

Broken Negroni (Negroni Sbagliato)

Helen Rosner

Mixologist David Welch pours this bubbly riff on a negroni at Sunshine Tavern in Portland, Oregon. Get the recipe for Broken Negroni (Negroni Sbagliato) »

Americano

Americano Cocktail

Americano

Ingalls Photography

The 19th-century Italian cocktail the Milano-Torino consisted of bitter Campari and Martini sweet vermouth. It is said that American travelers preferred their apéritifs with soda water, so the Milano-Torino with soda became known as the Americano. Get the recipe for Americano »

Negroni

Negroni

Negroni

Ingalls Photography

This classic cocktail couldn't be simpler—it's simply even parts gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth. Get the recipe for Negroni »

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Pink Negroni

Pink Negroni

Pink Negroni

Zoe Schaeffer

Light, orangey Lillet Blanc and fresh lemon juice brighten a springlike twist on the Negroni. Tarragon and tart, hibiscus-based Burlesque Bitters from Bittermens add floral, herbaceous notes. Get the recipe for Pink Negroni »

Contessa

Contessa

Contessa

Ingalls Photography

The Contessa, a modern creation of John Gertsen, a bartender at Boston’s Drink, replaces two of the Negroni’s three ingredients: Campari is swapped for the lighter and more orangey Aperol and dry vermouth substitutes for sweet. It’s more like the Negroni’s third cousin than a direct descendant. Get the recipe for Contessa »

Boulevardier Cocktail

Boulevardier Cocktail

Boulevardier Cocktail

Ingalls Photography

In this negroni variation, gin is swapped out for bourbon. Get the recipe for Boulevardier Cocktail »

Amber Negroni

Amber Negroni

Amber Negroni

Zoe Schaeffer

Replacing the Negroni's traditional sweet vermouth with Lillet and the Campari with Braulio, an herbal Italian amaro, gives this twist on the classic cocktail a rich amber hue and a pleasingly astringent edge. Get the recipe for Amber Negroni »

Negroni Sbagliato

Negroni Sbagliato

Negroni Sbagliato

Ingalls Photography

This bubbly Negroni variation, whose name means “bungled,” was invented at Bar Basso in Milan in 1968 when a bartender accidentally put sparkling wine into the drink instead of gin. It is an excellent choice for a brunch cocktail. Get the recipe for Negroni Sbagliato »

Old Pal

Old Pal

Old Pal

Ingalls Photography

In this negroni cousin, the gin is replaced with rye whiskey. Get the recipe for Old Pal »